CinnaZimtAnie


Split Pea Soup with Wild Rice and Apricot
April 2, 2010, 5:35 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,
Ingredients:
onions, to taste
garlic, to taste
thyme, to taste
1.5 cups split peas
1 qt broth (or more)
2/3 c wild rice
liquid smoke or smoked paprika
carrots, however much you have on your hand
other vegetables, whatever ones you want
something apricoty (jam, diced dried apricots, apricot juice, a pureed apricot, apricot chunks…)
salt
pepper
Dice some onions, saute in whatever you saute things in.  I use coconut oil or broth in my soup pot.
When they’re translucent, add some garlic and 1 T of dried thyme or the equivalent of dried thyme.
Add 1.5 cups dried split peas and lightly toss in the oniony deliciousness.
Cover with a quart of broth (or water+kombu). Bring to boil.
Reduce to simmer for 1 hour.
Add 2/3 cup wild rice. If at some point there isn’t enough liquid, add water.
Cook for another half hour. (The peas will have been cooking for 1.5 hours, at this point).
Add smoked paprika or liquid smoke. Add at least a cup of carrot, cut the way you want.  Add any other vegetables you have on hand…cauliflower, rainbow chard, mushrooms…whatever you want.
Now get some apricot in there — diced dried apricot, apricot jam, fresh apricot — whatever you can find and as much as you dare.
Cook another 15 minutes or so until the vegetables and wild rice are tender.
Salt & pepper to taste.
To serve: Ladle into bowls.  Pour a thin stream of olive or grapeseed oil over the soup.  It looks fancy even if you feel like you have a 3 year old’s coordination.  Just swirl a little around, honest.  Sprinkle on some pepper and paprika.
Accompany with a salad:
Bed of mixed greens
Pea Pods
Any other veggies you like to have in salads
Now make the dressing: olive or grapeseed oil + some kind of apricot (jam/juice/puree…whatever) + vinegar (Apple cider, red wine, balsamic, or even white) + pinch of salt.


Computer Cleanup
January 4, 2010, 4:06 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

I’m working on cleaning up my mother’s computer and I’ve been using a few different programs to help.  I thought I would post them here so I (or others) can find them later.

Process Scanner

Ad Aware

Easy Cleaner

Hijack This (if you don’t know what you’re doing, you might want to avoid this one or get some help)

I also used PC Decrapifier, but rather than downloading (and paying) for it, I looked at what it removes, and removed it by hand.



Health and Responsibility

For me, deciding on what food to eat is essentially a matter of deciding 2 things:

1. Is it healing?

2. Is it socially & environmentally responsible?

The answer to these questions can be challenging — how bad does it need to be for me to consider it harmful or reckless?  When is it merely questionable?   But generally I can chart both of these answers on this graph and when I begin wondering if something is too bad for me, others, or the environment, that signals I’m not comfortable with it.

Food Chart in which Health is the X axis and Responsibility is the Y axis

In a perfect world I would only eat food near the number 1: food that improves my health and the world around me.  But this isn’t a perfect world and I don’t eat in that part of the graph all the time.  I have a major sugar addiction, for one.  A limited budget.  A family history full of foods that trigger emotional responses, like nostalgia and pride.  I’m sometimes at the mercy of other people’s hospitality.  Right now I’m staying at my parents’ house and they don’t eat like me.  They also don’t have access to the same stores I have at home.  And food — especially organic produce — is limited in their town, in the winter.

So I’ve been wondering where my lines are, and which circumstances I am willing to eat in different parts of the graph.  I’m nearly always willing to eat foods that are harmful to me, but environmentally/socially responsible.  Vegan donut, made locally?  Ummm, yes please.

Where on the graph do I eat during holidays?  When someone else is preparing the food?  When I’m stressed (emotional eating)?  When I’m poorer than usual?   When I’m celebrating?  When something looks like it will taste really, really good?  When I’m already imposing on someone?  And why do I pick the circumstances I’m picking?  What does that say about me and my values?  My privileges?  My alliances?

In the coming days I’m planning to reflect on this more.  I’ll share what I come up with.  I would love to hear anyone else’s thoughts or stories in the meantime.



Organize your Fridge
December 21, 2009, 11:59 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

Today is just a link to Cooking by Kittee, that I think people will find helpful.  Kittee teaches you how to organize your produce so that it stays fresh longer.  And who doesn’t want crisper vegetables and fruit that stay fresh longer?   Or maybe you like paying for your produce and then throwing them out a week later?

That’s what I thought.



Dear Queer People (and allies), Let’s Do This Right
December 20, 2009, 11:59 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

I wrote this just after Proposition 8 passed.  Since then we’ve seen changes in our (queer) community.  I’ve had many conversations that tell me there’s some anti-racist work moving along, some movement towards dialogue with religious groups that aren’t usually allied with queer groups.  But obviously there’s still work to be done.  So here’s a repost.

I know some of you are just trying to keep your heads above water right now. If this election has brought out your depression or you’re still closeted and you haven’t been saying anything about all this prop 8 business, then I want you to run to your nearest bookseller and buy Kate Bornstein’s Hello, Cruel World: 101 Alternatives to Suicide for Teens, Freaks and Other Outlaws. Or, if you don’t have money, call a friend. Moisturize. Skip the rest of this post and concentrate on being okay.

If you’re already involved and keeping it focused on love and action…Keep Protesting! Keep Working! Stay Hydrated! Make space for yourself to feel what you’re feeling! Some of you have been working extra hard and really working for queer liberation. Your hearts and actions are in the right places. Great. Take this space to tell us some other ways we can get involved!

But so long as we’re protesting, let’s do it the best way we can, with the most love and efficacy, with the strongest alliances. Let’s look back and be proud of our accomplishments and our discourse. I believe in us. I think we can.

So listen up, queer community! We have been airing our dirty laundry since the fourth and we need to address this shit ASAP. And I’m not the only one who think so, so let’s take stock and do this right:

The first big concern I have is the racism and entitlement that allows (white) queer folks to name Black/African-American people as the problem, rather than as a part of our community, as our allies, or as our potential allies. This was not the group that poured money into passing Prop 8. Not to mention that queer people have a lot of different skin tones. I’m not the first to point these things out, but it bares repeating considering the racism showing up in queer white blogs right now. Let’s take this Prop 8 business as a reminder of what it feels like to be in the target group or to have people wield their privilege against us.

Let’s reread the exit polls. The people who voted to keep our rights intact are the people the queer community has done the best job of reaching out to. It looks to me like we’re good at talking to secular, urban, college educated, young, white people. That means that as a community we’re not reaching out to large groups of people. Some of those people are already in our community and we’re not doing a good job of including them. And we could both benefit from some alliance building. (What would it look like if the queer community were really anti-racist? What would it look like if we were befriending the elderly?)

The next issue I have is the attack on Mormons (specifically). They are not the only religious institution that gets political on this issue or any other. Are we using the LDS Church as an example because its easy to take shots at them? Because they aren’t like (most of) us? That is not to say the institution shouldn’t be held accountable–or better yet, educated– in some way. But targeting LDS instead of Catholicism or Evangelicalism? I think we should take stock and think about whether we’re targeting them because they “aren’t like us.”

And while we’re at it, I think we should stop with the language of retribution. Is that why we want to take away their tax breaks? To get even? This is not to say that religious organizations should receive tax breaks. I don’t think they should. Any of them. But passing prop 8 is not why. It is an example within a much wider problem. A good example, perhaps. But are we also willing to go after the progressive places of worship that supported Obama? Let’s also keep in mind that not all Mormons are homophobic or even political. I have LDS friends who have not been hostile and/or judgmental. Yes, of course the church and many of its members have not been our allies. But can’t we respond to people with love? What is so wrong with that? We know that spewing hate and lies hurts people. Why perpetuate it with the “they’ll get what’s coming to them” attitude?

Next, I’m annoyed with the comparison to animal rights (Prop 2). Californians don’t care more about animals than they do about queer people. Animals just received the right to turn around or spread their wings. Queer folks have not been locked in cages; chickens are not being given the right to marry. This is a case of apples and oranges. I’m sad that queer folks feel the need to fight over scraps. Let’s work on the system itself.

I’m sad too that we’re focusing so much of our national attention on California, and I suspect it is because this is the place we expected to do well, to hang onto our rights. I suspect it is also a way to maintain a focus on marriage. Let’s remember the other states that passed discrimination. Let’s remember the many different ways that LGBTQ people have been unequal in this country. Let’s remember the other groups that share our fates. Arkansas banned adoption for all unmarried people. Why is so much focus on California rather than Arkansas, where unmarried straight people and many, many children also stand to lose? I don’t think we should stop working in California, but I think it is worth reflecting on the reasons we’re focusing our national efforts here.

Okay folks…I expect a lot from my community. And I wouldn’t be calling this shit out if I weren’t also committed to action.

Let’s do this right.

A few disclaimers before I continue:

I know some of you are just trying to keep your heads above water right now. If this election has brought out your depression or you’re still closeted and you haven’t been saying anything about all this prop 8 business, then I want you to run to your nearest bookseller and buy Kate Bornstein’s Hello, Cruel World: 101 Alternatives to Suicide for Teens, Freaks and Other Outlaws. Or, if you don’t have money, call a friend. Moisturize. Skip the rest of this post and concentrate on being okay.

If you’re already involved and keeping it focused on love and action…Keep Protesting! Keep Working! Stay Hydrated! Make space for yourself to feel what you’re feeling! Some of you have been working extra hard and really focusing on equality. Your hearts and actions are in the right places. Great. Take this space to tell us some other ways we can get involved!

But so long as we’re protesting, let’s do it the best way we can, with the most love and efficacy, with the strongest alliances. Let’s look back and be proud of our accomplishments and our discourse. I believe in us. I think we can.

So listen up, queer community! We have been airing our dirty laundry since the fourth and we need to address this shit ASAP. And I’m not the only one who think so, so let’s take stock and do this right:

The first big concern I have is the racism and entitlement that allows (white) queer folks to name Black/African American people as the problem, rather than as a part of our community, as our allies, or as our potential allies. This was not the group that poured money into passing Prop 8. Not to mention that queer people have a lot of different skin tones. I’m not the first to point these things out, but it bares repeating considering the racism showing up in queer white blogs right now. Let’s take this Prop 8 business as a reminder of what it feels like to be in the target group or to have people wield their privilege against us.

Let’s reread the exit polls. The people who voted to keep our rights intact are the people the queer community has done the best job of reaching out to. It looks to me like we’re good at talking to secular, urban, college educated, young, white people. That means that as a community we’re not reaching out to large groups of people. Some of those people are already in our community and we’re not doing a good job of including them. And we could both benefit from some alliance building. (What would it look like if the queer community were really anti-racist? What would it look like if we were befriending the elderly?)

The next issue I have is the attack on Mormons (specifically). They are not the only religious institution that gets political on this issue or any other. Are we using the LDS Church as an example because its easy to take shots at them? Because they aren’t like (most of) us? That is not to say the institution shouldn’t be held accountable–or better yet, educated– in some way. But targeting LDS instead of Catholicism or Evangelicalism? I think we should take stock and think about whether we’re targeting them because they “aren’t like us.”

And while we’re at it, I think we should stop with the language of retribution. Is that why we want to take away their tax breaks? To get even? This is not to say that religious organizations should receive tax breaks. I don’t think they should. Any of them. But passing prop 8 is not why. It is an example within a much wider problem. A good example, perhaps. But are we also willing to go after the progressive places of worship that supported Obama? Let’s also keep in mind that not all Mormons are homophobic or even political. I have LDS friends who have not been hostile and/or judgmental. Yes, of course the church and many of its members have not been our allies. But can’t we respond to people with love? What is so wrong with that? We know that spewing hate and lies hurts people. Why perpetuate it with the “they’ll get what’s coming to them” attitude?

Next, I’m annoyed with the comparison to Prop 2 (animal rights). Californians don’t care more about animals than they do about queer people. Animals just received the right to turn around or spread their wings. Queer folks have not been locked in cages; chickens are not being given the right to marry. This is a case of apples and oranges. I’m sad that queer folks feel the need to fight over scraps. Let’s work on the system itself.

I’m sad too that we’re focusing so much of our national attention on California, and I suspect it is because this is the place we expected to do well, to hang onto our rights. I suspect it is also a way to maintain a focus on marriage. Let’s remember the other states that passed discrimination. Let’s remember the many different ways that LGBTQ people have been unequal in this country. Let’s remember the other groups that share our fates. Arkansas banned adoption for all unmarried people. Why is so much focus on California rather than Arkansas, where unmarried straight people and many, many children also stand to lose? I don’t think we should stop working in California, but I think it is worth reflecting on the reasons we’re focusing our national efforts here.

Okay folks…I expect a lot from my community. And I wouldn’t be calling this shit out if I weren’t also committed to action.

Let’s do this right.



Plural
December 19, 2009, 11:59 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

Originally posted on June 19, 2007, as a Facebook note.

I recently learned from my cousins & aunt that confetti, spaghetti, and graffiti are plural and that the singular forms are confetto, spaghetto, and graffito.They aren’t just secretive about their singularity, they’re deceitful too by continuing to take singular verbs.

Other exciting singulars, not all of which made the bridge from Italian to English…yet:

  • broccolo (broccoli)
  • biscotto (biscotti)
  • panino (panini)
  • salam (salami)
  • illuminatus (illuminati)

I call on those of you who have strong opinions on grammar (whether descriptive or prescriptive) to do whatever it is you need to do.  I don’t think I’m the only one who would enjoy eating asking for just one piece of broccolo or throwing a confetto.



(Vegan) Scones w/Clotted Cream
December 18, 2009, 11:59 pm
Filed under: Food | Tags: , , , , , , ,
I posted this a bunch of places and even shared it with my (decidedly not vegan) grandfather.  Since they’re always a hit I thought I’d res-hare even though I don’t have pictures and recipe posts should always have pictures, AND I no longer eat this kind of thing.

I included some substitutions that I would try first to improve the health-giving properties of the recipe. I haven’t experimented with any of these changes in this recipe, though, let alone all of them at once.  So try the grey version of the recipe at your own risk/pleasure.

A lot of scones are brick like, too sweet, or full of cranberries or lemon flavoring. These scones are light, fluffy, and just a little sweet. Rock on. The clotted cream recipe is lifted from here with only mild changes.

Scones
1 1/2 cups white flour + 1/2 cup whole wheat flour (Sub 2 cups of whole wheat pastry flour, or use a gluten-free blend similar to Bob’s Red Mill GF All Purpose.  The increased protein of this blend is also helpful in digesting the sugars.)
5 tbsp sugar (At least use evaporated cane juice/sucanat.  Preferably use 5 tbsp date sugar, which is a whole food but not diabetic friendly, or 5 tbsp xylitol, which is diabetic friendly.  Alternately, this can be left out entirely because the toppings are so sweet.)
1 tbsp baking powder (non-aluminum!)
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp margarine, cut into pieces (at least make sure it is Soy Free Earth Balance.  Preferably use 6 tbsp coconut oil/butter +3/8 tsp more salt)
1/3 cup soy milk (1/3 cup almond, rice or cashew milk)
5 tbsp ground flax seeds
6 tbsp water

PRE-HEAT the oven to 400 degrees.
COMBINE combine the flour, 3 tablespoons of the sugar, baking powder, salt, and flax seed in a large bowl. Cut in the margarine.
STIR soy milk and water into dry ingredients until dough forms.
KNEAD a few times on a floured surface, then roll out into a circle about 2 inches thick. Slice like a pizza or a pie into 8 triangles.
PLACE the triangles on a baking sheet and sprinkle with the remaining sugar.
BAKE 20-25 minutes until lightly golden.
SERVE with clotted cream, jam, and tea.

Clotted Cream
1/4 cup Earth Balance, cold (at least 1/4 cup Soy Free Earth Balance.  Preferably 6 tbsp coconut oil/butter +1/4 tsp salt)
1/4 cup Tofutti Cream Cheese, cold (at least non-hydrogenated Tofutti.  Preferably 1/4 cup raw vegan cream cheese)
1 T soy milk (cashew, almond, or other neutral tasting non-dairy milk)
2 tsp. powdered sugar (The powdered sugar adds sweetness and a thickening starch: I might use 1 1/2 tsp agave, leave out the non-dairy milk, and assume I don’t need the thickener because I’ve used less liquid to begin with)

BLEND and chill.

Favourite Comment from a past posting:

Dharma Kelleher said…Sounds appetizing but the name “clotted cream” has to go. Seriously! Sounds like a really itchy yeast infection.




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